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reblogged from bethestraw

bethestraw:

The Korean Martyrs

Blessings to you all, brothers and sisters!

Today, the Church celebrates the lives of 103 canonized martyrs from Korea, including St. Andrew Kim Taegon and St. Paul Chong Hasang. Through their utter devotion to Christ, even unto death, these saints received imperishable crowns of glory….

reblogged from heartlessmuffineater

signum-crucis:

Married on a CrucifixFr Michael Mullan, LC
Imagine a world without divorce. Imagine families without separation. Imagine no children or hearts torn apart.
People of one place in this world do not have to imagine.
In the town of Siroki-Brijeg in Herzegovina not one of the 13,000 inhabitants can recall a single divorce or broken family.
What is their secret? One look at their marriage rite says it all.
When the bride and bridegroom go to the church to be married they carry a crucifix with them. The priest blesses the crucifix and exclaims, “You have found your cross! It is a cross to love, to carry with you, a cross that is not thrown off but rather treasured.”
When they interchange the marital vows, the bride puts her right hand on this crucifix and the groom puts his right hand over hers. Both are united to the cross. The priest covers their hands with his stole while they pronounce their promises to love each other in good times and in bad.
Then they both first kiss the cross, not each other. If one abandons the other, they abandon Christ on the cross.
Afterwards, the newly-weds cross the threshold of their home to enthrone that same crucifix in a place of honour. It becomes the reference point of their lives and the place of family prayer.
In times of difficulty and misunderstandings, as all human relationships experience, they do not turn immediately to the lawyer or psychologist, they turn to the cross. They kneel, cry and open up their hearts begging for the strength to pardon and implore the Lord’s help.
The children are taught to reverently kiss the crucifix daily and to thank God for the day before going to bed. These children dream of enthroning one day a crucifix of their own.
The family is indissolubly united to the cross of Christ. Is this simply a morbid outlook on marital and family life? Or is it a piece of wisdom that few in our modern world can understand. Until our world does, it will continue to imagine and long for the unbroken hearth.
-=:†:=-
“The Sacrament of marriage comes as do all the sacraments from the wounded side of Christ as He lay ‘asleep’ in death, when Christ was pierced by a sword and blood and water and the Holy Spirit flowed out. At that moment the Church and all the sacraments came from the side of Christ as Eve was taken from the side of Adam. The Church is the Bride of Christ and the Catholic marriage is to be a living example of Christ and His Bride the Church. If the Catholic couple lives in a state of grace and has the sacrament of marriage they receive constant grace from God to love one another with the very LOVE of God. It is the vocation of the spouses to sanctify one another and be open to new life. According to Archbishop Sheen it takes 3 to get married: husband, wife and Christ. Marriage works in Christ.”—my friend Kathleen Ann

Beautiful.
Relevant.

signum-crucis:

Married on a Crucifix
Fr Michael Mullan, LC

Imagine a world without divorce. Imagine families without separation. Imagine no children or hearts torn apart.

People of one place in this world do not have to imagine.

In the town of Siroki-Brijeg in Herzegovina not one of the 13,000 inhabitants can recall a single divorce or broken family.

What is their secret? One look at their marriage rite says it all.

When the bride and bridegroom go to the church to be married they carry a crucifix with them. The priest blesses the crucifix and exclaims, “You have found your cross! It is a cross to love, to carry with you, a cross that is not thrown off but rather treasured.

When they interchange the marital vows, the bride puts her right hand on this crucifix and the groom puts his right hand over hers. Both are united to the cross. The priest covers their hands with his stole while they pronounce their promises to love each other in good times and in bad.

Then they both first kiss the cross, not each other. If one abandons the other, they abandon Christ on the cross.

Afterwards, the newly-weds cross the threshold of their home to enthrone that same crucifix in a place of honour. It becomes the reference point of their lives and the place of family prayer.

In times of difficulty and misunderstandings, as all human relationships experience, they do not turn immediately to the lawyer or psychologist, they turn to the cross. They kneel, cry and open up their hearts begging for the strength to pardon and implore the Lord’s help.

The children are taught to reverently kiss the crucifix daily and to thank God for the day before going to bed. These children dream of enthroning one day a crucifix of their own.

The family is indissolubly united to the cross of Christ. Is this simply a morbid outlook on marital and family life? Or is it a piece of wisdom that few in our modern world can understand. Until our world does, it will continue to imagine and long for the unbroken hearth.

-=:†:=-

“The Sacrament of marriage comes as do all the sacraments from the wounded side of Christ as He lay ‘asleep’ in death, when Christ was pierced by a sword and blood and water and the Holy Spirit flowed out. At that moment the Church and all the sacraments came from the side of Christ as Eve was taken from the side of Adam. The Church is the Bride of Christ and the Catholic marriage is to be a living example of Christ and His Bride the Church. If the Catholic couple lives in a state of grace and has the sacrament of marriage they receive constant grace from God to love one another with the very LOVE of God. It is the vocation of the spouses to sanctify one another and be open to new life. According to Archbishop Sheen it takes 3 to get married: husband, wife and Christ. Marriage works in Christ.”
my friend Kathleen Ann

Beautiful.

Relevant.

Just released.

Check it out @catholicwoman and @emilty =)

reblogged from pilgrimlog

pilgrimlog:

A Muslim’s “Turning Point” Standing Before Michelangelo’s Pietà
The Pietà by the young Michelangelo is one of the world’s most recognized and priceless works of art.  This past Lent and Holy Week, I’m sure that you’ve seem many images of the Pietà which depict that moment when the pierced and blood Body of Jesus is placed in Mary’s arms.  As the literal name for this most lamentable scene implies, many people’s reaction is “pity” or “compassion”.
I remember taking the photo above when I made a pilgrimage to Catholic Disneyland Rome last October.  Sadly, upon seeing this famous sculpture, I am ashamed to admit, that my first reaction was not one of pious devotion.  Rather, I was a little annoyed that so many people were gathered around the small chapel (next to Bl. John Paul the Great’s tomb) where the Pietà is displayed behind bullet proof glass.  As I maneuvered my way through the crowd of tourists, all I was focused on was getting the shot.  Once I got to the front of the crowd, I was struck by the great cultural, historical, and artistic significance of this piece.  Then, I was moved by the broken, lifeless body of Christ held in the lap of His Mother. With her left hand, Mary tenderly bears the Savior of the World, and with her right hand, she raises her palm up to heaven, every ready to accept and follow the will of God.
While still basking in the joyful light of the Resurrection, I cannot help but see Michelangelo’s Pietà as an image of the Church:  our ancient but ever youthful Mother who embraces the cross and presents the Body of Christ to the Body of Christ. 
For us Catholics, art is more than church decoration, something pretty to look at.  Art can provide us with an encounter with God who is the source of all that is True and Good and Beautiful. 
Read more

pilgrimlog:

A Muslim’s “Turning Point” Standing Before Michelangelo’s Pietà

The Pietà by the young Michelangelo is one of the world’s most recognized and priceless works of art.  This past Lent and Holy Week, I’m sure that you’ve seem many images of the Pietà which depict that moment when the pierced and blood Body of Jesus is placed in Mary’s arms.  As the literal name for this most lamentable scene implies, many people’s reaction is “pity” or “compassion”.

I remember taking the photo above when I made a pilgrimage to Catholic Disneyland Rome last October.  Sadly, upon seeing this famous sculpture, I am ashamed to admit, that my first reaction was not one of pious devotion.  Rather, I was a little annoyed that so many people were gathered around the small chapel (next to Bl. John Paul the Great’s tomb) where the Pietà is displayed behind bullet proof glass.  As I maneuvered my way through the crowd of tourists, all I was focused on was getting the shot.  Once I got to the front of the crowd, I was struck by the great cultural, historical, and artistic significance of this piece.  Then, I was moved by the broken, lifeless body of Christ held in the lap of His Mother. With her left hand, Mary tenderly bears the Savior of the World, and with her right hand, she raises her palm up to heaven, every ready to accept and follow the will of God.

While still basking in the joyful light of the Resurrection, I cannot help but see Michelangelo’s Pietà as an image of the Church:  our ancient but ever youthful Mother who embraces the cross and presents the Body of Christ to the Body of Christ. 

For us Catholics, art is more than church decoration, something pretty to look at.  Art can provide us with an encounter with God who is the source of all that is True and Good and Beautiful. 

Read more

reblogged from pilgrimlog

pilgrimlog:

Triumph of the Church Over Sin by Raul Berzosa (my new favorite contemporary Catholic artist)
I wish all modern art could be this nice beautiful.
[Photo:  “Triunfo de la Iglesia Sobre el Pecado” from Raul Berzosa]

pilgrimlog:

Triumph of the Church Over Sin by Raul Berzosa (my new favorite contemporary Catholic artist)

I wish all modern art could be this nice beautiful.

[Photo:  “Triunfo de la Iglesia Sobre el Pecado” from Raul Berzosa]

reblogged from pilgrimlog

pilgrimlog:

Spy Wednesday
“One of the Twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests and said, ‘What are you willing to give me if I hand him over to you?’ They paid him thirty pieces of silver, and from that time on he looked for an opportunity to hand him over.” (Matthew 26:14-17)
[Photo:  “Judas Accepts Payment” by Giotto from Ad Imaginem Dei]

pilgrimlog:

Spy Wednesday

“One of the Twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests and said, ‘What are you willing to give me if I hand him over to you?’ They paid him thirty pieces of silver, and from that time on he looked for an opportunity to hand him over.” (Matthew 26:14-17)

[Photo:  “Judas Accepts Payment” by Giotto from Ad Imaginem Dei]

reblogged from heartlessmuffineater

mystagogy:

I read a great blog from a woman who is convinced that, if the Supreme Court rules against us in the abortion/sterilization/contraception mandate, we should neither pay the fines nor shut down our hospitals, schools and charities. She makes a great case for it.

She wrote a…

reblogged from heartlessmuffineater

In former times, Christians were incited to renounce Christ; now they are taught to deny Christ. Then they were forced, now they are taught; then violence was used, now it is deception; then one heard the shouts of the Enemy; now, when he prowls around, gentle and insinuating, it is difficult to recognize him. Everyone knows how he tried to force Christians to deny Christ: he tried to attract them to himself so that they would renounce him; but they confessed Christ and were crowned by him. Now they are taught to deny Christ by trickery, because he doesn’t want them to realize that he is drawing them away from Christ.

St. Augustine in his Commentaries on the Psalms, 39:1 (via badwolfcomplex)

reblogged from bethestraw

bethestraw:

Click here for today’s readings!

The Transfiguration of Jesus Christ is one of my favorite stories in the Bible. The Divine glory of the Savior manifests before Peter and the sons of thunder. And to top it all off, a cloud overshadows all present, from which comes a voice, “This is my beloved…

reblogged from heartlessmuffineater

It’s tempting to make Lent some ambitious period of personal reinvention, but it’s best to keep it simple and focused. There’s a reason the Church works on these mysteries year after year. We spend our entire lives growing closer to God. Don’t try to cram it all in one Lent. That’s a recipe for failure.

Bishop David Ricken (Green Bay)

(Source: usccbmedia.blogspot.com)